Arturo O'Farrill
Sunday July 27, 2014 12:00pm

Jazz Festival

Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra, The Music of Joe Henderson with Renee Rosnes All Stars, Emily Bear Trio, and More

Overview

Jazz Aficionado or just Jazz Curious-if you love live music, this Jazz Festival is for you! The day begins with a must- see performance for the whole family by 12-year-old piano sensation Emily Bear and her trio. Next, Emily and jazz master John Beasley lead a very special jam session with an elite group of hand-picked musicians from the exciting and competitive world of New York’s best institutions of music. Trombonist Steve Turre pays tribute, through discussion and performance, to departed jazz trombone legend JJ Johnson, John Beasley presents a fabulous set of the music of Thelonious Monk, and Pianist Renee Rosnes offers a robust conversation about and performance of the enduring music of tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson. After an hour-long dinner break, Arturo O’Farrill and his Grammy® award winning Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra will bring the energy and full sonority of Sonidos Latinos back to the Caramoor Jazz Festival to close out the day.

 

Photo by Gabe Palacio

Let us pack your picnic for you! For delicious dining and the ease of ordering a picnic in advance, consider the special picnic menu offered by our caterer, Great Performances. Picnic tables are available, and you may bring your own blankets and lawn chairs if you like. This service is only available Thursday through Sunday on performance days during the summer. Ordering Picnics for this event is now closed.

 

Watch Emily Bear’s story below and listen to Arturo O’Farrill and his Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

 

Day only ticket-holders:

10:00
Gardens and grounds open for exploring. Sound art exhibition In the Garden of Sonic Delights open all day.
11:00
Concessions and food trucks (Pizza Luca, Katchkie Farms) open.
12:00
Emily Bear Trio
Emily Bear, Peter Slavov, Mark McLean
1:00
Jazz House Kids Jam Session John Beasley, music director
1:30
Rosen House docent tour (sign up required; additional fee)
2:00
Masters on Masters. WBGO’s Gary Walker interviews Steve Turre about JJ Johnson—the Man and His Music
2:15
The Music of J. J. Johnson, with Steve Turre All Stars
Steve Turre, Rufus Reid , Victor Lewis, Xavier Davis

Full Festival ticket-holders:
All of the above, plus:
3:00
Rosen House docent tour (sign up required; additional fee)
3:15
Monk’estra Sketches, John Beasley Trio
John Beasley, Terreon Gully, Hans Glawischnig
4:15Masters on Masters. Gary Walker interviews Renee Rosnes about Joe Henderson
4:30
The Music of Joe Henderson, with Renee Rosnes All Stars
Renee Rosnes, Jimmy Greene, Peter Washington, Lewis Nash
5:30
Dinner Break
6:30
Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra

Caramoor Members:

12:00 – 6:00
Jazz Lounge open in the Reception Tent for covered picnicking and private concessions. Not a Member yet? Join!

Day only ticket-holders:

10:00
Gardens and grounds open for exploring. Sound art exhibition In the Garden of Sonic Delights open all day.
11:00
Concessions and food trucks (Pizza Luca, Katchkie Farms) open.
12:00
Emily Bear Trio
Emily Bear, Peter Slavov, Mark McLean
1:00
Jazz House Kids Jam Session John Beasley, music director
1:30
Rosen House docent tour (sign up required; additional fee)
2:00
Masters on Masters. WBGO’s Gary Walker interviews Steve Turre about JJ Johnson—the Man and His Music
2:15
The Music of J. J. Johnson, with Steve Turre All Stars
Steve Turre, Rufus Reid , Victor Lewis, Xavier Davis

Full Festival ticket-holders:
All of the above, plus:
3:00
Rosen House docent tour (sign up required; additional fee)
3:15
Monk’estra Sketches, John Beasley Trio
John Beasley, Terreon Gully, Hans Glawischnig
4:15Masters on Masters. Gary Walker interviews Renee Rosnes about Joe Henderson
4:30
The Music of Joe Henderson, with Renee Rosnes All Stars
Renee Rosnes, Jimmy Greene, Peter Washington, Lewis Nash
5:30
Dinner Break
6:30
Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra

Caramoor Members:

12:00 – 6:00
Jazz Lounge open in the Reception Tent for covered picnicking and private concessions. Not a Member yet? Join!

 

Arturo O'Farrill

Arturo O’Farrill

Arturo O’Farrill

Grammy Award winning pianist, composer and educator Arturo O’Farrill — leader of the “first family of Afro-Cuban Jazz” (NY Times) — was born in Mexico and grew up in New York City. Son of the late, great composer Chico O’Farrill, Arturo was Educated at Manhattan School of Music, Brooklyn College Conservatory and the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College. He played piano in Carla Bley’s Big Band from 1979 through 1983 and earned a reputation as a soloist in groups led by Dizzy Gillespie, Steve Turre, Freddy Cole, Lester Bowie, Wynton Marsalis and Harry Belafonte.

In 2002, he established the GRAMMY winning Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra in order to bring the vital musical traditions of Afro Latin jazz to a wider general audience, and to greatly expand the contemporary Latin jazz big band repertoire through commissions to artists across a wide stylistic and geographic range. A celebrated composer with a frequent new ground-breaking and forward-looking perspective, Mr. O’Farrill has received commissions from Meet the Composer, the Big Apple Circus, the Philadelphia Music Project, Symphony Space, and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. He has also composed music for films, including Hollywoodland and Salud.

His debut album with the Orchestra, Una Noche Inolvidable, earned a GRAMMY Award nomination in 2006 and the Orchestra’s second album, Song for Chico,(ZOHO) earned a GRAMMY Award for Best Latin Jazz Album in 2009. In February 2011, Mr. O’Farrill and the ALJO released their third GRAMMY nominated album, 40 Acres and a Burro (ZOHO). In 2011, O’Farrill released his first solo album, The Noguchi Sessions, (ZOHO).

 

Renee Rosnes

Renee Rosnes

Renee Rosnes

Renee Rosnes is one of the premier pianists and composers of her generation. Shortly after relocating from Vancouver, Canada to New York in 1986, Rosnes quickly established a reputation as a major talent. Rosnes toured and recorded was the pianist of choice for
such legends as Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, JJ Johnson, James Moody, the
SFJAZZ Collective [2004-2009], and Bobby Hutcherson among others, her
resumé reading like a “who’s who” of jazz. From 1990 through 2000, she was
the pianist for the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band.

As a leader, Rosnes has released twelve critically acclaimed recordings, which reveal her to be a powerful and sensitive musician, collaborating with a diverse range of artists, from Ron Carter and Jack DeJohnette, to younger giants such as Chris Potter, Christian McBride and Lewis Nash.

As well as touring and performing with her own band, she frequently performs with her husband, renowned pianist Bill Charlap in a two piano setting. The couple’s debut recording, Double Portrait, was released in 2010 on the Blue Note label. In the role of jazz journalist, Renee has contributed two major cover story interviews for JazzTimes Magazine, one with master musician Wayne Shorter and his quartet (April 2013) and the other with pianist Geri Allen (September 2013). Rosnes is currently a member of legendary bassist Ron Carter’s Foursight Quartet.

 

Emily Bear

Emily Bear

Emily Bear

A child of this century, born Aug. 30, 2001 in Rockford IL where she still lives with her parents and older brother and sister, Emily started to show extraordinary musical talent practically from the cradle. “There was never a definitive date when it began – it’s always been,” says Andrea. “As a baby, she would sing back lullabies to me in perfect pitch. By 18 months, she was experimenting constantly at the piano. At just past 2 years, my mother thought it was my son playing. She was composing tangible pieces since she was 3. By the time she was 4, she was having pieces published and distributed by Hal Leonard.”

At age 5, Emily made her concert debut at the Ravinia Festival in Chicago, playing a 40-minute solo program performing classical pieces side by side with jazz standards and her own compositions. She was invited to perform at the White House at age 6. Later that year, she opened for Ramsey Lewis and his Trio with a 30-minute set of her own. Her orchestral debut came at age 7, playing Mozart Piano Concerto no. 23, K488 and by age 8, she was playing concerts abroad in Italy and China. At the age of 9 she made her Carnegie Hall debut with a 110-piece orchestra, a 220-voice choir, and R&B soloists performing one of her compositions, “Peace – we are the future.”

“She’s the most delightful human being I’ve ever met in my life,” Quincy Jones says. “And her music is the same way. I am at once astounded and inspired by the enormous talent that Emily embodies. With the ability to seamlessly move from Classical to Jazz and Be-bop, she shows as much musical prowess as pianists/composers twice her age, and I am thrilled to be working with her. She’s astounding, man … she’s astounding. She plays like she’s 40 years old. She is the complete 360-degree package, and there are no limits to the musical heights she can reach.”

 

Steve Turre

Steve Turre

Steve Turre

Trombonist Steve Turre is a pioneering musical seashell virtuoso, a composer, arranger, and educator at the collegiate-conservatory level who, for fifty years, has been active in jazz, rock, and Latin jazz — in live venues, recording studios, television, and cinema production. As a studio musician, Turre is among the most prolific living jazz trombonist in the world. This is Steve Turre’s thirtieth year with the Saturday Night Live Band.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Beasley

John Beasley

John Beasley

Pianist John Beasley has become an immensely important musician.  “It takes courage beyond borders to play this music,” says John. “In the 1930s, jazz guys came to Europe not knowing who they’d play with, but look what came out of that!’ Beasley, a far-ranging pianist and arranger who has—to a degree —sacrificed his own name value to take good care of others. When Sergio Mendes, Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard, Queen Latifah, Steely Dan and many others turn to John Beasley for help, that’s what they get!!  Over the past three years, he has stood at the helm of UNESCO’s International Jazz Day Concerts in Paris, Istanbul and Japan. John’s smashing new 16-piece big band is called “Monk’estra,” featuring the off-beat melodies and humor, strange beauty and unbounded swing of the music of Thelonious Monk—in fresh arrangements flavored with hip-hop, Afro-Cuban rhythms and atmospheric colors. Today, his master trio performs selections from his big band and other delights.

 

 

 

 

 

 

jhk_drawing_06

Jazz House Kids

Zoe Obadia, alto sax

Rahsaan Pickett, guitar

Theo Walentiny, piano

Alex Warshawsky, bass

Connor Malloy, drums

Celebrating their 10th year, Jazz House Kids provides the framework inside which students from diverse backgrounds can play, sing and appreciate America’s original musical art form. Through music, mentoring, education and apprenticeship, they cultivate tomorrow’s community leaders and global citizens so they may build vibrant communities where they live. Jazz House Kids is a community-based arts organization with a mission to provide year-round musical, educational, and cultural programs to students in grades K-12, teachers, adults, and families from diverse backgrounds. Internationally renowned jazz performers teach alongside our professional staff, offering students a wide range of creative programming that develops musical potential, enhances leadership skills, and strengthens academic performance.

WHAT IS A JAZZ HOUSE?

Quite simply, a Jazz House is the creative space where we come together with young people, their families and teachers to share, appreciate and learn about the jazz experience. It is a mobile house, constantly in play, with wheels that turn on improvisation as it negotiates its way toward that incandescent goal: the celebration of jazz. It is a house whose foundation is built on:

·         Respect for creativity

·         Celebration for diversity

·         Harmony in teamwork

·         Love for self and others

·         An abiding passion to preserve the legacy, and ensure the future, of jazz.

JAZZ HOUSE KIDS – HISTORY

Jazz House Kids (JHK) is a community-based arts organization that provides year-round musical, educational, and cultural programs to students in grades K-12, teachers, adults, and families from diverse backgrounds. What started as a straightforward idea nearly 10 years ago for professional jazz vocalist and JHK founder Melissa Walker-to open the window for students to understand, appreciate, and apply jazz and its rich cultural and international legacy-has become a rich gathering place of musical talent and shared promise. In less than a decade, JHK has become a highly regarded New Jersey arts education and performance organization, fostering a strong community of award-winning students, dedicated teachers, and first-rate professional musicians. JHK is committed to closing the gap in music education in our schools and communities by using America’s homegrown music – jazz – to cultivate tomorrow’s responsible global citizens and community leaders.

JHK has created and tested programming and learning opportunities aimed at boosting achievement, providing enrichment for students from largely underperforming schools, and awakening the musical sensibilities of young and old students alike. JHK’s 125 school-based programs have served more than 15,000 New Jersey public school students and over 1,200 teachers and administrators. In 2009, Walker’s vision became reality, when JHK opened its “Jazz House” studio school in downtown Montclair to augment its robust in-school and out-of-school programming by providing year-round instruction for students of all ages and levels. The Jazz House now serves students from more than 10 counties and over 20 communities across New Jersey, and provides instruments and scholarship support for 34 percent of its student body.

NOTABLE STRENGTHS

JHK has developed award winning big bands and combos and many of our students continue their studies at some of the nation’s leading colleges and conservatories. What sets JHK apart from other arts organizations is the unparalleled access students have to professional jazz musicians, some of whom are internationally acclaimed, ensuring that JHK students receive an authentic jazz education and are mentored by a host of extraordinary talent. While JHK supports and trains some of the region’s most talented students, unique to our organization is the capacity to serve a diverse student body with varying needs and musical abilities through creative and thoughtful programming.

JHK’s notable strengths include vibrant partnerships among public schools, area universities, local arts organizations, individual and institutional funders, and a community of celebrated jazz musicians and dedicated teaching artists who share their time and talents with students. Melissa Walker, Jazz House Kids founder and executive director, believes that every student deserves a great arts education and has crafted JHK to bridge the gap in music instruction in our schools and in our community. World-renowned bassist and educator Christian McBride serves as creative director and on the Jazz House Kids board. The organization also boasts a talented professional staff, a strong and motivated volunteer core, and a top-notch board of directors, whose members are personally supportive of and committed to Jazz House Kids’ success.

 

Gary Walker

Gary Walker

Gary Walker

WBGO’s Gary Walker interviews Saturday Night Live Band trombonist Steve Turre at the Jazz Festival.

In jazz radio, great announcers are distinguished by their ability to convey the spontaneity and passion of the music. Gary Walker is such an announcer, and his enthusiasm for this music greets WBGO listeners every morning. For the past 22 years, this winner of the 1996 Gavin Magazine Jazz Radio Personality of the Year award has hosted the morning show each weekday from 6:00 -10:00. And, by his own admission, he’s truly having a great time.

“It’s rare that I don’t want to get up and come in to work in the morning. I really love this job, and I don’t think everyone can say that.” Walker declares with satisfaction. He’s probably right in that assumption. But listeners preparing for work each morning with Gary on the radio will no doubt admit, he makes it easier to head off to work no matter how we feel about it.

His love of jazz is apparent, and he says it’s a feeling that began during adolescence growing up outside of Detroit in the mid 1960’s. He remembers his dad bringing home a new radio with an FM band.

“This was pretty new at the time. Almost all of radio was on AM,” recalls Walker. “There were only two stations on this new FM band, and one played jazz. They often broadcast live from a club known as the Twenty Grand, and though I can’t remember the artists, I will never forget the feeling of that music. It seemed that the musicians and the crowd were having such a great time. I just wanted more of that feeling.”

His next recollection is of an occasion when his mother dropped him off at the record store. He had planned to buy a novelty pop album that day. However, amid the display posters and album covers promoting new releases, Gary noticed an album by Henry Mancini entitled Music From Peter Gunn. He sampled a few cuts in the listening booth, and enjoyed what he heard. It was the first jazz record he would buy.

“I didn’t know it was jazz, I just knew I liked it,” he says. “Frankly, I believe most of us approach jazz that way – we discover it by accident.”

Though he may have learned about jazz by accident, his interest in the music grew deliberately. While his peers were listening to rock and roll, Gary aggressively sought jazz. He listened to Miles Davis, Ramsey Lewis and other cutting-edge artists. He was a finance major at the University of Texas at the time. He remembers passing the campus radio station, and noticing that everyone had so much fun. He soon abandoned finance and graduated with a degree in Mass Media. He continued his studies at the University of Akron in Ohio where he was a radio announcer on the school’s jazz radio station. He continued to hone his broadcasting skills, and became proficient at the technical aspects of radio production.

Soon he moved to New York City with plans to broaden his career endeavors. Within five weeks he landed an announcer’s position on Saturday mornings at WBGO. The station was new then, but Gary remembers it as a special place.

“My first day here, I ran into Mercer Ellington (Duke’s son),” recalls Walker. “I couldn’t believe it…one of the greatest band leaders around, and he was sitting right here. Around the same time other great artists would drop by regularly. I met Wayne Shorter, Woody Shaw and Dexter Gordon.”

After 24 years with WBGO, legendary artists continue to visit the studios, many to join Gary during Morning Jazz. He believes their visits are part of what set the station apart from other jazz stations. However, he also believes that other jazz 88 announcers, producers and programming staff contribute to the distinction of the station.

“I think we’re the best jazz station in the country, perhaps the world,” he says plainly. “I think that because of the knowledge we have here, the fun we have here and the music that is created here. No one else does what we do.”

No matter how gratifying Gary finds his work, nothing brings him as much joy as his 20 year old son, Nate. From early visits to Jazz 88 with his dad, his son became a first year trombone player in the school band. Gary says, “Nate knew I was going to interview Wynton Marsalis and told me, ‘Dad, tell Wynton I’m playing the trombone, but next year I might switch to trumpet.’ When I passed this information on to Wynton, Marsalis’ response was, ‘you tell your son if he wants to elevate his social status, he should make that change as soon as possible!'” Just a note: Nate still has a trombone and Wynton has more social status. Nate’s dad has neither, but loves his work at Jazz 88!

Gary Walker